Data Protection and Use Policy

Data Protection and Use Policy

Last updated 4 February 2021
Last updated 4 February 2021

Guidance for TEOs on the Data Protection and Use Policy which supports the safe and respectful use of data and information by government agencies and service providers.  The policy goes beyond privacy and applies ethical considerations to the use of people’s information.

What is the Data Protection and Use Policy (DPUP)?

The Social Investment Agency’s DPUP was collaboratively developed with government agencies, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and people who use social services.

The DPUP supports the safe and respectful use of data and information by government agencies and service providers. It includes five principles to guide data protection and use, and four good-practice guidelines in areas identified as needing greater clarity. These principles were created from the viewpoints of a diverse range of service users, social service providers, government agencies, iwi and other Māori groups, Pacific peoples and disabled communities.

The DPUP goes beyond privacy and applies ethical considerations to ensure that if and when we contemplate using people’s information, it’s done with the involvement, understanding and support of the people impacted by those proposals.

The DPUP principles do not affect laws relating to the collection, use or sharing of personal information (such as the Privacy Act). But they take the position that at times you can go further than the law's minimum requirements, where it's lawful to do so, in order to build trust.

The data protection and use principles

He tāngata – Focus on improving New Zealanders’ lives – individuals, children and young people, families, whānau, iwi, aiga and communities.

Strive to create positive outcomes from any collection, sharing or use of data and information. Use appropriate checks and balances and ensure that information is suitable and reasonably necessary for the intended outcome.

Manaakitanga – Respect and uphold the mana and dignity of the people, whānau, communities or groups who share their data and information.

Recognise and incorporate diverse cultural interests, perspectives and needs. Include and involve services users whenever possible. Incorporate the needs and priorities of people with a specific or particular interest in what is done with their data and information.

Mana whakahaere – Empower people by giving them choice and enabling their access to, and use of, their data and information.

Where possible, give people choices and respect the choices they make. Give people easy access to and oversight of their information wherever possible.

Kaitiakitanga – Act as a steward in a way that is understood and trusted by New Zealanders.

Recognise you are a kaitiaki, rather than an owner, of data and information. Be open and transparent; support people’s interest or need to understand. Keep data and information safe and secure and respect its value.

Mahitahitanga – Work as equals to create and share valuable knowledge.

Confidentially share relevant information between professionals so people get the support they want and need. Make sure there is a two-way street of sharing (de-identified) data, analysis, results and research findings to grow collective knowledge and improve services.